Katalin Novák: „We always have to fight against antisemitism”

Hungarian minister for family affairs Katalin Novák highlighted the importance of fighting against antisemitism at the Malmö International Forum on Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Antisemitism.

Katalin Novák claimed during her interview with the Hungarian official news agency MTI that keeping the Holocaust’s memory alive and taking action in the fight against antisemitism all around Europe – and therefore in Hungary – is very important, as there were many Hungarian victims.

Regarding the threat of antisemitism, she stated that the fight must go on relentlessly, because the sentiment can re-emerge.

Antisemitism is present here in Sweden as well, but also in many other European countries– stated Katalin Novák. She also invited the participants of the conference to say it out loud that it cannot be allowed in Europe that people holding antisemitic views take positions as government officials or decision-makers.

In relation to this, she pointed out that in Hungary, the alliance of the opposition openly nominates several antisemitic representatives, and there are parties whose members express antisemitic sentiment. She highlighted that in case they gain power, people holding antisemitic views will fill a position in the government. According to her statement, the Hungarian government does a lot to preserve the memory of the Holocaust, Holocaust education is part of the country’s national curricula, the study material of which was created jointly with Jewish organisations. Hungary also holds the Holocaust Remembrance Day, and supports the Jewish community with other means as well; for example, with renovating synagogues, thereby supporting the feeling of security in the Jewish community.

Katalin Novák also mentioned the role of protecting the country’s borders, which, among others, serves the protection of the Jews. She then finished her speech by declaring her pride in the security of Budapest as a city and Hungary in general, a country where it is safe to live as a Jew or a non-Jew.